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Lego rejects another Zelda Hyrule Castle set in its latest product review

Lego and nintendo might have a fruitful collaboration with Lego Super Mario, but fans hoping for another one of Shigeru Miyamoto’s creations to go brick today will suffer another setback – as the latest Lego Ideas review rejects yet another set based on The Legend of Zelda.

The last Lego Ideas Review is live – and while another new project has been approved for release as a genuine, official Lego set through the process – sadly, another Zelda set has fallen to this level, the final hurdle.

The set in question is titled “Hyrule Castle 30th Anniversary” and was a pretty stunning recreation of the version of the iconic castle found in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. It also contained Lego minifigures of Link, Zelda and a Bokoblin, as well as brick minifigures of Ganon, Koroks and Guardians. Link even has his Paraglider and Master Cycle, the latter of which was introduced in a BOTW DLC.

If you’re not familiar with Lego Ideas, it’s a nice little platform that the Lego Group runs where Lego fans can submit their own sets. Any set that gains the support of 10,000 Lego Ideas users is submitted to a panel of Lego designers within the company, who then debate and dissect the sets. Some, if approved by Lego and any third party rights holders, will then become a true set.

Lego Ideas has become a major sub-brand for Lego in recent years and has delivered a mix of original and licensed sets. Versions based on Ghostbusters, The Flintstones, TRON, Home Alone, Doctor Who, Sesame Street made their way to store shelves through the Ideas program.


In the world of video games, the excellent recent Lego Sonic the Hedgehog set came from the Ideas program, as did the very first Lego Minecraft set. In the case of Minecraft, a single set of ideas led to a full line of Minecraft-branded building sets, a theme still thriving to this day.

Bad luck for Zelda, though. This is the latest in a series of Zelda Ideas submission rejections – another excellent Hyrule Castle (this one based on the N64 version) was rejected just 9 months ago, alongside sets based on Metroid, Animal Crossing, and Among Us.

Sets can be rejected from Lego Ideas for various reasons. It could be that Nintendo said no to a collaboration with Zelda, but with the Mario tie-up going from strength to strength, one wonders how likely that is. Factors such as construction stability, safety and playability are also considered. It could be that Lego just doesn’t see the market for the set – or it could conflict with a project already in development at Lego HQ. By the way, that last bit wouldn’t necessarily mean there’s a Zelda set in the works – but, for example, Lego has a huge Castle set coming out next month to mark the company’s 90th anniversary, which could ride just about any castle in Hyrule. , licenses be damned.


Despite this, Lego continues to double down on its connection to the game. The toymaker recently had its first collaboration with Sony for a Horizon: Forbidden West-themed release, and Lego Mario continues to go from strength to strength after adding Luigi and Peach as as playable characters. Collectors also have a new release to look forward to: a full-scale Lego Bowser, with impressive articulation.

On Lego Ideas, meanwhile, Zelda and gaming fans continue to tune in. Currently looking for enough support to go to the Lego team for review, this is a Giant Brick Link and one mini diorama of Koholint Island from Link’s Awakening, among others.

Elsewhere in the game, Ideas currently has a slew of playsets looking for support, including those based on Pac man, Metroid Dread, Gate, Cupheadand star fox, to name a few. There are also more generic game-related sets, including a Space Invaders “playable” arcade terminaland life-size Lego versions of the PS2 Console and PS5. In the table world there is an impressive playable Lego version of Settlers of Catan.

If you want to make any of these projects a reality, you can do so by signing up and supporting them on Lego Ideas – and pray they don’t get rejected. Hyrule Castle was. It’s long, but it’s better than nothing, right?